Links to Aussie Resources.

Here are some helpful and informative links and resources about Aussies:

 

Australian Shepherd Resource

Australian Shepherd Lovers.com

Canada's Guide to Dogs

 

Australian Shepherd Clubs

Central Ontario Australian Shepherd Club

Australian Shepherd Club of America

Canadian National Australian Shepherd Club

Health and Genetics

Australian Shepherd Health and Genetics Institute

 

Australian Shepherd Rescue

AROO - Australian Shepherd Rescue of Ontario

OTHER HELPFUL RESOURCES FOR NEW PUPPY OWNERS:

BRINGING HOME YOUR NEW PUPPY

Videos by McCann dog training:

Bringing Home A New Puppy Series

POTTY TRAINING

 

PUPPY BITING AND CHEWING

Video by McCann dog training:

STOP Puppy Biting With These 7 Rules For Training

 

From AKC

https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/training/stop-puppy-biting/

 

EXERCISE NEEDS BY AGE:

Blog by ThatMutt:

https://www.thatmutt.com/2016/06/19/how-far-can-i-walk-my-puppy/

 

And here is a great chart and easy to follow from Avidog:

https://www.avidogzink.com/wp-content/uploads/puppy_exercise_guidelines_poster.pdf

 

FEAR PERIODS TO BE AWARE OF:

WHAT IS SOCIALIZATION?

  • There are critical  developmental stages during which puppies learn to be comfortable with new situations, people, dogs, cars, and really anything they'll encounter during their lives.  Key stages begin while the puppy is with their breeder at 3 weeks and goes until 12 weeks.  This is why I raise my puppies using Puppy Culture protocols.  There are specific things that are done with the puppies during each appropriate developmental week. 

  • During this period puppies can bounce back from encounters with new things or even slightly scary things and will have that in their tool box going forward.  After 12 weeks, that window closes and any new, novel things that they haven't been exposed to can become suspicious and scary.  They can still learn to be comfortable but it may take longer to help the puppy.

  • Pairing new experiences with food and praise can actually modify the brain chemistry of the puppy and in future, those experiences can be associated with good feelings, eg food!

  • There is research and evidence that shows that puppy socialization can be harmful if done incorrectly.  Forcing your puppy to interact personally with every person you meet and every dog you meet can overwhelm and create fear in the puppy that can develop into reactivity in the future.  Most socialization should actually be having your puppy observe new things and situations without showing fear or aggressions…being calm and looking to you for reassurance and providing treats to reinforce calm behavior during these scenarios is all that is needed. 

  • Finding a few friendly, health dogs for your puppy to play with, if he/she wants to, is far better than forcing your  puppy to interact with strange dogs at a dog park.  I recommend avoiding dog parks as there are frequent outbreaks of kennel cough and owners don't always know how to read their dogs or even care to and dog fights are frequent.  One bad experience at a dog park can permanently damage your puppy's perception of other dogs/people and result in reactivity which is very difficult to reverse.

  • Some helpful articles from the AKC:

https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/training/puppy-socialization/

and

https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/training/socialize-puppy-times-social-distancing/

  • Puppy play…when puppy play becomes too much or too aggressive:

https://www.bestfriendsvet.com/library/behavior-training/puppy-play-or-aggression/

 

DOGGY ADOLESCENCE

  • You puppy will start going through adolescence at around 6 to 8 months and this will last until about 18 months.  During this time, puppies start to push the boundaries and can forget all their great training.  Consistency and patience will get you through this period! 

https://www.rover.com/blog/uk/training-your-adolescent-dog/

and

https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/health/adolescent-puppy-changes/

 

FLEA AND TICK MEDS AND MDR1

  • If you feel a need to use a flea/tick medication, I recommend AdvantixII which is available either from your vet or from Global Pet Foods.  This one has been shown to be a little safer for Australian Shepherds and other herding breeds for which the MDR1 mutation can be a concern.

  • Australian Shepherd Health and Genetics Institue:  http://www.ashgi.org/home-page/genetics-info/faq/genetics

  • ***What is MDR1?  Here is some info you need to provide to your vet before they give your dog ANY medications: 

 http://www.ashgi.org/home-page/genetics-info/faq/mdr1-faqs

  • Puppies in this litter have a chance of having only one copy of the mutation or no copies.  Addy is clear but the sire, Rhett, carries one copy.  No puppies will have two copies.  However, ASHGI recommends that all Aussies, regardless of whether they have none, one, or two copies, be treated as if they are fully affected because it is known that some with no copies have been affected so the genetics may not be fully known.

  • Brands to avoid because they are known to cause seizures and death are:  Nexguard, Bravecto, Simparica Revolution and literally anything you find in a pet food store (except AdvantixII).

 

RAW FEEDING MADE EASY

WHAT IS POSITIVE REINFORCEMENT TRAINING?

  • FREE Puppy Culture course:  Must go through the purchase process but payment is $0

https://madcapuniversity.com/collections/frontpage/products/with-open-arms-and-a-level-head-how-to-bring-a-puppy-into-your-life?fbclid=IwAR0YeXpFXWI0M_ANBHkHhCm2YDfW2t_jFNckboNdGHmaMtyObfR3_PWSs6w

 

GROOMING YOUR OWN AUSSIE IS EASY!

  • Heidi Mobley of Western Hills Aussies has a great Youtube video series demonstrating how to groom your Aussie.

 Grooming the Australian Shepherd Part 1

  • Aussies really only need to be line brushed, nails trimmed, and feet, ears and tail area trimmed.

  • PLEASE NEVER SHAVE YOUR DOUBLE COATED AUSSIE!!  THEY NEED THE 2 LAYERS TO INSULATE THEM FROM HEAT, COLD, AND WATER.

  • Most dog groomers take off WAY too much of the beautiful fringes and featherings on the legs, chest, underbelly and ruin the beauty of the Australian Shepherd profile.  If you 'must' use a groomer, please ensure they have experience with Aussies and only trim the feet, tail, ears.

 

LATER SPAY/NEUTER

  • Although most vets still recommend spay/neuter by 6 months, research is showing that spay/neuter later, such as 18 months to 2 years is better for the overall growth and skeletal and immune health of your dog.

  • My contracts require a late spay/neuter for these reasons.

  • https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fvets.2020.00388/full

 

The AKC’s Canine Health Foundation sponsored research that indicates there may be long-term health benefits to spaying or neutering dogs after they have passed through puberty. Benefits to neutering after puberty can include a reduction in orthopedic health problems, a possible reduction in certain cancers in specific breeds, and possible improved behavior. More research is ongoing in this area to compare differences among breeds and size of dogs.

https://www.akc.org/expert-advice/health/spaying-and-neutering-your-dog-faqs/

 

VACCINATION PROTOCOLS

  • My contracts require the following of the Dr. Jean Dodds vaccination protocol to avoid over vaccinating your puppy.

  • I recommend following her schedule for only the core vaccines as indicated in this article (rabies, distemper, parvo and if not possible to not give, adenovirus) in order to not void the puppy health guarantee. 

  • After the first annual booster, I recommend running a titre test instead.  Your vet will still make $$ from you and your dog will thank you.  A titre will show if the dog still has antibodies for the virus and if they have even a tiny number showing up, then you DON'T need to do another booster.  For rabies I recommend the 3 year boosters after the first one year booster.

https://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/which-dog-vaccines-are-necessary/

And

https://www.animalhealthfoundation.org/blog/2017/12/dr-jean-dodds-dog-vaccine-protocol/